Witch-hunters, Injustice and Superstition: How Science and Skepticism Will Benefit Africa?

Canberra Skeptics Inc. and the CSIRO Discovery Science Centre Proudly Present:
Mr Leo Igwe
Date: 18 August 2011
Time: 6-7.30pm
Location: Optus Theatre, CSIRO Discovery Science Centre,
Clunies Ross Street Acton ACT 2601
Free Admission

Africans stand to gain a lot by embracing the skeptical outlook; what are those gains?
Will Africans ever harvest them? And how do we ensure that Africa reaps the fruits of skeptical rationality?

Mr Leo Igwe will talk about how science and skepticism has been used to challenge irrational beliefs systems that have resulted in children being killed for being witches. He will also discuss the consequences of challenging such beliefs in Africa and the role science, skepticism and critical thinking can play in Africa’s future.

Leo Igwe is the founder of the Nigerian Humanist Movement, the Nigerian Skeptics Society and former director of the Center for Inquiry/Nigeria. Leo currently works for the International Humanist and Ethical Union (IHEU) as its director in West and Southern Africa. He also represents IHEU at the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights in Banjul, Gambia. In the past few months, Leo has spent much of his time rescuing alleged witch children in Akwa Ibom state in Southern Nigeria. Leo has been arrested, detained and beaten up several times by the police and local gangs in the course of his work and campaign against superstition, injustices and religious fanaticism. He writes for “The Skeptic” and has authored numerous articles on human rights, humanism, skepticism and freethought in Africa.

Dinner will follow the lecture at the Canberra Club (Level 1, 45 West Row Canberra City ACT 2601).

To RSVP for the dinner please contact mail@nullcanberraskeptics.org.au
For further information about Canberra Skeptics Inc. please visit our website: http://www.canberraskeptics.org.au/

For any media enquiries please contact Cris Kennedy: cris.kennedy@nullcsiro.au

The event was made possible by a generous grant from the National Science Week 2011.