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Northern Territory healer permanently banned

A Northern Territory man who claimed to cure a range of medical illnesses and addictions through mind communication and supernatural healing has been permanently banned from conducting his business in the Territory.

Following action by NT Consumer Affairs, Colin Thompson (pictured above), trading as “Esoteric Mind Specialist”, was also restrained from making any representations that he has the ability to cure addiction or medical conditions through mind communication or supernatural healing for a period of five years.

In July 2015, Consumer Affairs Commissioner Gary Clements, issued a public warning to Territorians not to deal with Thompson who could not substantiate the efficacy of his treatment which he described as miraculous and supernatural.

According to a 2014 report from the ABC, Thompson previously ran a tobacco shop in Darwin’s Smith Street Mall.

“He said he ran the business,” the report says, “which was near a hotel and pokie machines, so that he could easily make contact with people who had addictions.

Thompson told the ABC he became aware of his healing gift after visiting a spiritual healer in the Philippines in 2000.

“We became friends and it took three years of phone calls and healings for me to be able to contact the supernatural world,” he said.

Over a 10 year period he had made about $500,000 from the business, he told the ABC.

In a statement issued on November 8, the Commissioner said: “Consumer protection laws require that any claims made by a business when they market their products and services are accurate, truthful and can be proven.”

As a result of Local Court proceedings, Thompson also deregistered his business name and business bank account. Consumer Affairs had earlier taken steps to shut down his website where he promoted claims such as “general practitioners, specialist and surgeons can’t cure anything or anyone” and “there is nothing in the physical world to take away the cause of an ailment permanently”.

Clements said, “As a regulator our concern is to protect the vulnerable, people seeking relief from serious medical conditions or addictions. Particularly in the area of health services where there is a risk that people could stop conventional treatments, businesses must ensure that claims about their therapies are supported by credible and reliable results. They must not make false claims about the quality, history, benefits, performance or origin of a product or service.”

Tim Mendham: